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Toy Reviews Glossary


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#1 Ridureyu

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Posted 01 October 2003 - 02:57 PM

This thread is for anybody to add terms that they think are relevant to discussion.


Sculpt: This refers to the figure itself, obviously. The actual plastic/rubber/flesh that it's made of, and what shape/condition it's in. Level of detail and accuracy play large roles in this rating.

Paint Job: This obviously refers to, well, how well-painted the figure is. Also sometimes referred to as paint Apps.

Articulation: Articulation refers to the number of movable joints that a figure has. Most action figures have five- arms, legs, and head. Others can have many, many more.

Accessories: This refers to things that the toy comes with. It could be anything, from backdrops to weapons to little sidekicks or extra hands/heads.

Value: This refers to whether or not the figure is worth its cost. Romandohs, for example, cost far more than they're (usually) worth, whereas there are always some figures worth $30 that cost $10. Also referred to as Pricing.

GOtGM: The Gross Out the Girlfriend meter. A good explanation of it is here: http://www.oafe.net/poe/gotgm.html

Playability: This is used only in connection with toys that are game pieces. What it means, basically, is how useful the figure is in the game that it's from (Example: Mage Knight miniatures).

Overall: The basic impression of the figure. is it worth it?

Edited by Ridureyu, 02 October 2003 - 12:05 AM.

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#2 Tortle

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Posted 01 October 2003 - 06:55 PM

Good idea, Ridureyu... different people have different styles of toy reviews and it's nice to know where the reviewer is coming from.

My review attributes are pretty much the same, except for two factors:

Looks: This factor is a combination of the quality of the sculpt and the paint job. Since each factor in my reviews is weighted and contributes evenly to the overall score, I felt that the sculpt and paint job should be combined into one factor: looks.

Coolness: This is simply how "cool" or "fun" I think the figure is. It is admittedly a somewhat ambiguous attribute, but it usually includes stuff like: the figure's playability; how much I dig the character; and how neat the figure looks in dioramas.

And some of my reviews have this factor:

Staying Power: This is essentially how long the figure holds my interest. Some figures seem awesome when I first buy them. But soon I simply lose interest and place them on a shelf never to be touched again, leaving me to wonder, "Why the Hell did I buy this? And what was I thinking when I wrote that review?!" "Staying Power" takes this into account.

I score each attribute equally, on a scale of 0 (unimaginably horrible) to 5 (perfect). By this scale, these are my recommendations depending on the Overall score...

4-5: It's a great toy and I highly recommend it.
3-4: The toy is pretty cool, and recommeded if you're interested.
2-3: Recommended if you are a big fan of the line.
1-2: This toy is horrible and should only be purchased by completists, if anyone.
0-1: This garbage has absolutely no redeeming value, and all collectors should avoid it.

-Nathan

Edited by Tortle, 08 March 2004 - 02:17 PM.

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#3 Ridureyu

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Posted 02 October 2003 - 12:01 AM

Todd McFarlane: The creator of the Spawn comics, who founded his own toy company after trying unsuccessfully to get someone to produce Spawn figures. The toys that he produces are known for several things.

1. An immense level of detail. Some of them put STATUES to shame. Often, figures of humans look just like the original actors, and ones of monsters seem about to leap out and eat you.

2. Use of licenses, often from comic books, movies, or video games. Mcfarlane makes toys of what no one else will make, which brings us to point no. 3.

3. Really, really "Adult" toys. These range from the horrendously grotesque ( http://spawn.com/toy...ct=blairmonster ) to the overtly sexual ( http://spawn.com/toy...product=dorothy ) to a mixture of both ( http://spawn.com/toy...product=szaltax ). Note. Do not click these links if you are easily offended by... well, stuff that would easily rate OVER 10 on the GOtG meter.

4. Limited articulation. Note that this does not apply to ALL McFarlane merchandise. Some of his newer stuff is incredibly well-articulated, but alas, the vast majority of his work consists of statues with movable feet.

5. High prices. Usually.

6. Overall coolness. In case you think that ALL of McFarlane Toys is represented in the above links, take a look at these:

http://spawn.com/toy...roduct=predator
http://spawn.com/toy...duct=t850coffin
http://spawn.com/toy...&product=moishe
http://spawn.com/toy...=malebolgia-mut
http://spawn.com/toy...duct=majormaxim



And now you know what someone means when they call a figure "McFarlane-esque." It could either mean that it's of really high quality, or that it's sickening.

Edited by Ridureyu, 02 October 2003 - 12:02 AM.

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#4 Ridureyu

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Posted 03 October 2003 - 12:44 AM

Romandoh: A company that produces toys. More specifically, in this forum the name is used to refer to one toyline: The Romandoh Ultimate Muscle series (Which was named LONG before the US dub, by the way). Romandoh figures are generally known for the following things:

1. Incredible attention to detail. While some of the sculpts are too detailed, or detailed in the wrong ways (ex: Buffaloman, Ramenman), the majority of Romandoh figures look just like their Kinnikuman counterparts (ex: Big the Budo, Sunshine, Brocken, Jr.). The detail in the sculpting is tremendous, and mkaes them good display pieces. Others, such as Akumashogun, are not necessarily accurate to the original series, but still look incredible.

2. Incredible articulation. MOST of the Romandoh figures are well-articulated enough to perform their own wrestling moves. You can make Brocken, Jr. Sig Heil, for example.

3. Difference in plastic used. Some figures are solid plastic (ex: Brocken, Jr., Akumashogun), and others are rotoscoped vinyl (ex: Sunshine, Junkman). The "major" characters are almost always solid, and thus of higher quality. The "minor" characters are usually hollow.

4. Incredible variety of characters. From the series giants (like Terryman) to the two-bit minor characters (like Benkiiman), the Romandoh series is constantly growing, and just might have everybody by the time that it finishes production.

5. Incredibly high prices. The cheapest Romandoh figures will run about $35, if you're lucky. The most expensive cost about $70. This is a major problem for most people.


And there you have it- the often talked-about, highly sought-after Romandohs!
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#5 Tortle

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Posted 03 October 2003 - 06:13 AM

Rotocasting: This is a molding process different in technique and appearance than traditional injection molding. This quote from OAFE.net sums it up well:

Rotocasting (rotational casting) got its start in Germany in the mid-20s, with the creation of those hollow chocolate bunnies that are still around today. First, liquid material is poured into a mold. The mold is rotated on two axes (that's "more than one axis," not "things you use to chop wood") and the liquid coats the interior walls. The liquid solidifies as it cools, creating strong yet thin hollow shapes with smooth interiors.

Rotocasting is gaining in popularity because it's cheaper, faster, and more reliable than traditional injection molding. The molds last longer and present better results, and it takes less time to turn out parts. Most rotocast figures are molded from PVC (soft, pliable plastic) rather than ABS (the hard, brittle stuff), which does present some limitations when it comes to types of articulation, but nothing major.


Rotocasted figures do not have a crease in the mold like injected figures. Also, they usually have swivel or ball-in-socket joints since hinge joints are difficult to design in the rotocast process. For an example of a rotocast figure, check out the 13" Rotocast Hulk.

-Nathan

Edited by Tortle, 03 October 2003 - 06:31 AM.

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